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Friday, April 3, 2020

New Fellowship for Pro-Life Creatives


Building off its successful Wilberforce Fellowship (for college and graduate leadership) and Stevens Fellowship (for high school leadership), Students for Life of America is launching the Hildegard Art Fellowship:
The Hildegard Art Fellowship is about engaging young artists to use their artistry to change hearts and minds on abortion by becoming artist activists.
Art in its multitude of forms has a unique way to speak to and impact our culture. At Students for Life, we seek to abolish abortion on many platforms including politics, education, and service. The Hildegard Art Fellows don’t just encounter culture; they captivate culture.
The inaugural class will consist of visual artists, five writers, and five performing artists. If you meet the criteria, I encourage you to apply! Speaking as a former Wilberforce Fellow (and current mentor), if the Hildegard Art Fellowship is anything like SFLA's other fellowships, it will be an incredibly valuable experience. The application deadline is May 1. 

And speaking of the arts, a friendly reminder that submissions are open for the Create | Encounter pro-life art contest; you can read more about that here. It's a great time to be a pro-life artist activist!

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Video: Effective Pro-Life Education on Campus

Secular Pro-Life president Kelsey Hazzard here. Last weekend, I was scheduled to speak at a Florida leadership summit for pro-life high school and college students, organized by Students for Life of America. The original venue was shut down due to the coronavirus, but the show must go on, so I presented over Zoom. The video recording is now up on our facebook page. Although my presentation is geared toward students, it contains information that I hope will be helpful to pro-life advocates of all ages.

If you'd like to skip around, here are topic timestamps:

1:32 - 5:22, why outreach to non-religious people is important
5:22 - 9:30, dialogue tips
9:30 - 14:1, the abortion industry's religious strategy
14:12 - 15:45, building a secular organization on campus
15:45 - end, Q&A

Side note: the young woman in the purple shirt who speaks during the Q&A is Gabrielle Gabbard. You might recognize that name because when she started her pro-life club at Gulf Coast High School, the administration wasn't thrilled, and she had to threaten legal action to get the club approved. In a wild coincidence, I am a graduate of Gulf Coast High School. We'll be sure to meet in person once it's safe to do so!

Monday, March 30, 2020

Pro-life work while sheltering in place

If you find yourself with more time and less mobility than usual, here are some ways you can keep doing pro-life work:

1. Increase our own knowledge. We asked our followers what books and film/TV shows—whether giving a pro-life or pro-choice perspective—have informed their perspectives of the abortion debate. Below are partial lists, but you can read all of the book suggestions here and film/TV suggestions here.

Books/other reading:
  1. Abortion Rites: A Social History of Abortion in America - Marvin Olasky
  2. Bearing Right - Will Saletan
  3. Defenders of the Unborn: The Pro-Life Movement before Roe v. Wade - Daniel Williams
  4. The Ethics of Abortion - Christopher Kaczor
  5. Our Bodies, Our Souls - Naomi Wolf
  6. Roe v. Wade - text of the Court's decision
  7. Stuck: A Complete Guide To Answering Questions About Abortion - Justina van Manen
  8. The Unaborted Socrates - Peter Kreeft
  9. The Walls Are Talking - Abby Johnson
  10. Why Pro-Life - Randy Alcorn
Film/TV shows:
  1. Arrival
  2. Bella
  3. Call the Midwife
  4. The Giver
  5. Gosnell
  6. Juno
  7. October Baby
  8. A Quiet Place
  9. The Silent Scream
  10. Unplanned
  11. Waitress
(You might get more ideas from the many pro-life movie quotes we've collected.)


2. Donate to organizations on the front lines. We asked our followers which organizations can directly help pregnant and newly parenting people. If you prefer to go local, quick online searching should turn up pregnancy resource centers in your area. Meanwhile below is a partial list of follower suggestions, and here are the full responses. (Note: as of 3/27/20 all of the following orgs were still open.)
  1. Abide Women's Health Services (Texas) — They have a COVID-19-based Amazon wish list.
  2. Ava Care of Harrisonburg (Virginia)
  3. The Crossing of Manitowoc County (Wisconsin)
  4. Diaper Bank of the Ozarks (Missouri)
  5. Expect Hope (New York City)
  6. Good Counsel Homes (New Jersey) 
  7. The Life House (Nebraska)
  8. Safe Families for Children (multiple locations)
  9. Sisters of Life (New York City) — Amazon baby registry

3. Do online work. We asked our followers for other ways to help while sheltering in place. Read the full responses here but below are some ideas:
  1. Promote pro-life content on social media (like, comment, and share)
  2. Write a guest blog post for Secular Pro-Life!
  3. Educate yourself on local resources for mothers (assistance with rent or utilities, food, diapers, access to health care and education, etc.) Keep a list for reference.
  4. Contact your favorite pro-life orgs and ask them if they have any online volunteer opportunities. You never know who needs a translator, editor, web designer, graphic artist, database manager, etc.

Read more:


Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Pro-Life Status Report from Germany

[Editor's note: Today's guest article by German pro-life advocate Andreas Düren was written before the coronavirus outbreak.]

In Germany, abortion is generally illegal under Section 218 of the criminal code. The only exceptions are the so-called "medical indication" (danger to the life of or the threat of grave impairment to the pregnant woman's physical or mental health" as well as "criminal indication" (the termination of pregnancies which are the result of rape or incest).

The "medical indication" abortions are almost exclusively abortions because of disabilities of the child: almost 4.000 cases a year.

The German Federal Constitutional Court has ruled twice that even pre-born children have human dignity and the right to life. Unfortunately, that said, there are over 100,000 abortions in Germany every year. That means 6.1 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-44 (compared to 13.5 in the United States).

The vast majority of abortions (96%) are performed illegally. Those are abortions that are not indication-based, but instead based on a landmark decision of the Constitutional Court. In 1993, it decided that it is not possible to protect the unborn child without their mothers. To dissuade women from choosing an abortion, all participants go unpunished if:
  • the woman visits a state-certified pregnancy consultation center; 
  • she follows a three-day-waiting period to reconsider; and  
  • the decision to abort is solely hers (pressuring someone into an abortion is a criminal offense). 
These abortions are still illegal, but they are not punished. They are provided by doctors and abortion facilities. This ruling created a strange situation, where it says that abortions are generally wrong because every human has dignity and the right to life and, at the same time, opened the door for technically illegal but practically legal abortions.

The state acknowledges that abortions are a problem and says that we need to reduce the number of abortions, but does not do anything to actually achieve this goal. For example, the federal republic of Germany publishes a roughly 300-page annual report on the condition of the forests in Germany, including proposals on how to improve the situation. There is no such thing for abortions. In a way, a German tree enjoys better protection than a pre-born child. 

Even though the counselor is required to write a report of the counseling, it does not include, for example, the reasons stated for wanting an abortion (the woman is not obliged to say a single word during the counseling). With this crucial information missing, there is no way to remove the reasons for an abortion. The counseling is – at least according to the law – required to persuade the woman to carry her child to term. In practice, however, counseling is geared to an "open outcome" and can even be performed on the phone. 

Over 100,000 children aborted every year is an astronomical amount. The number of unreported cases might be much higher, though. Doctors are obliged to report the numbers of abortions performed but are not financially compensated for this work – meaning no incentive to actually report correct numbers. It also doesn't account for mothers who travel to neighboring countries for their abortions. 

German society views the topic of abortion with hesitation, with the majority seemingly being personally pro-life but politically pro-choice. But most people will not talk about the issue, even in family circles. It is considered to be something taboo. Most people do see there being something wrong with abortion but are too afraid to go against the mainstream view and not knowledgeable enough to actually form a well-informed decision. Even the majority of people who firmly believe that abortion is wrong under all circumstances are often too afraid to leave their comfort zone and to engage in debates on the issue, mostly out of fear of being seen as anti-women. 

Unfortunately, here as in many countries, abortion is almost seen as a more "humane" way of dealing with an unwanted pregnancy. An adoption is seldom an option for many of these women because it is seen as being more emotionally damaging for the mother than the abortion. Five to ten times as many couples are waiting to adopt, as children up for adoption exist. 

One of the leading groups that are openly fighting for abortion is the "Coalition for Sexual Autonomy." Among other things they call for unrestricted access to legal abortion up to birth, mandatory teaching of abortion procedures during medical school, and elimination of Section 219a of the criminal code which prohibits the promotion of abortion for financial gain. These people find it necessary to scream, insult, and disrupt any pro-life event; they have even stalked pro-life activists, vandalized churches, destroyed pro-life counseling offices, and set cars on fire

A young woman holds a Sundays for Life sign
In the face of this hostile situation towards life-affirming institutions, my wife and I decided to start a pro-life non-profit to break the taboo, inform the general public and do general public relations/marketing for the pro-life message. The name of our organization is Sundays for Life. We have taken to being incredibly blunt in our presence in the downtown of our city. Our color is fuchsia pink, and the banner and signs are hard to miss. We want people to leave their comfort zone. Because let's face it: death is not comfortable, especially not the deaths of millions of babies. 

Over the last few weeks, we have taken to Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. We have shared two of the many videos we hope to produce. The videos that we created are personal stories of people affected by abortion: one woman's crisis pregnancy and how she chose life for her child, and a man's account of his role in his wife's abortion. These personal testimonies are virtually non-existent here in Germany and Europe in general, and we hope to reach people by these captivating, challenging, and personal stories. So far, we have reached thousands with our videos, and there are more videos to come soon. We want to engage the general public on social media with humorous and thought-provoking content. We want debates to take place. Because when people talk about abortion, they have to think about abortion.

Monday, March 23, 2020

Submissions open for Create | Encounter pro-life art contest

Rehumanize International has opened submissions for its annual Create | Encounter contest. With large gatherings cancelled for the foreseeable future, why not use that time to create meaningful art?

Rehumanize International is a consistent life ethic (CLE) organization, promoting respect for human life at all ages. Create | Encounter is for pieces that "explore subjects of aggressive violence against human life, dehumanization, and human dignity surrounding such issues as abortion, abuse, capital punishment, embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia, human trafficking, physician assisted suicide, poverty issues, racism, suicide, torture, and unjust war." That's not a comprehensive list; your art can address a wide variety of social ills. And speaking of variety, Create | Encounter is open to many types of media, from poetry to visual art to music to short stories and more.

Above: "Dilation and Evacuation," SPL president Kelsey Hazzard's mixed media piece from the 2018 Create | Encounter contest. Sopher forceps, a common tool in second-trimester abortions, are juxtaposed with damaged photo negatives.

Not to brag, but historically, members of the Secular Pro-Life community have been well represented among the winners and honorable mentions (and yes, artwork is judged anonymously). So click here for full submission guidelines, and get creative! The deadline is July 1.

Friday, March 20, 2020

What changed an abortion counselor's mind


Linda Couri worked at Planned Parenthood but left and became pro-life. She gave an interview on the WeDignify podcast where she spoke about her experiences working for the largest abortion provider in America.

Couri believed in Planned Parenthood's mission, which she saw as educating young people about sex and providing health care. In retrospect, she thinks one reason she worked at Planned Parenthood was the affirmation they gave her about her own abortion. Couri was strongly pro-choice but had never been able to convince herself that abortion was not killing a baby. When she had her own abortion, she says she just “tucked it away into a little spot far, far away for a long time” and tried not to think about it.

Workers at the Planned Parenthood facility affirmed her choice and eased any lingering sense of guilt:
[I] could surround myself with a lot of really good, caring women, self-sacrificial women working at Planned Parenthood, who would surround me and say, "yeah, it's okay. It's okay that you did this. It was your right. Not only that, it was probably better for the whole world." And so, it helped to keep the psychological distress of the abortion at bay. 
While working at Planned Parenthood, Couri struggled with the issue of abortion:
What did cause me distress was the issue of abortion, merely because although I was pro-choice, i.e., you shouldn't take away the right of a woman to control her own body – I was highly convinced of that – but I also knew that something really bad was happening, like killing very small people. So that had always made me uncomfortable. But the dissonance that that created, I often was able to avoid. Avoid, and just not deal with it. 
Couri mainly worked in sex education, but she was sometimes asked to counsel women considering abortion. One day, she was asked to talk to a pregnant 16-year-old. Couri says:
She's crying and scared. My job was to go through her options, and after comforting her and letting her know it would be okay, I said, "Well, you have three options. The first is, you can keep the baby. That will be difficult, but we can help you through that.… And I said, "you could give up your baby for adoption. That too will be hard, but we can help you with that." Because we did have connections with adoption agencies, and to help girls through their pregnancy. And then I said, "or you can have an abortion." 
Although Couri attempted to be neutral, she was convinced that abortion was the best choice for the girl:
[I]n my mind, at the time, I really, truly, from the bottom of my heart, believed that abortion was the best option for her. I saw her carrying the baby and keeping the baby as really ruining her life. For making her life way too difficult. And I saw her, quote, “giving the baby up” for adoption … But I also saw that option as being very difficult. So, in my mind, abortion really was the best option. After all, I had had an abortion, and it [had] seemed like the best option to me – I was unscathed, right? But I saw it as her choice, so I presented these three options. 
The girl asked Couri, “Please tell me one thing. If I have an abortion, am I killing my baby?" Couri describes her response:
It was hard, because I knew that she was. But I decided to answer by saying, "Well, you will be terminating the product of your conception." Which was meant to deflect the question. And I knew it. And she looked at me kind of confused, and she scheduled an abortion. Which I really thought was the best option for her, but I was really stressed out, because I didn't answer her question. [I] rhetorically tricked her. 
Couri felt guilty for being dishonest. She went to her supervisor:
I went to go talk to my supervisor. Who was really great. I said, "I just lied to her." And she and I – we didn't play the semantics game, like, oh, it's not a life, it's not life – we both kind of just went straight to the issue, which was like, this is the best option for her. Abortion's the best option. This is a hard job that we have, and it's a hard choice, but [it's] the best choice for her and for her life. That's what we believed. But still, there was, like, this fuzzy dissonance. It was like static in my head. 
This was not the last difficult conversation Couri had with other staff. One day, a nurse who worked at the facility came into Couri’s office, upset and on the verge of tears. Couri explains:
She came into my office, and she seemed to be upset, and she shut my door. And she said, "I don't understand why I'm so upset, Linda. I've been doing this for a long time, but for some reason it's really getting to me because I just saw a little hand, during an abortion procedure." And, she and I sat, knee to knee – two women that were being paid very little to do the work that they do, feeling like we had a mission – sitting knee to knee holding each other's hands. And being really sad, kind of weeping a little bit, and saying, "Are we doing the right thing?" And spending a bunch of time convincing each other that we were. Hugging each other and saying "Carry on. Onward and upward! Let's go do the right thing."
These incidents unsettled Couri, but then she discovered something else. Couri was thinking of doing an academic research project on women’s responses to abortion. In the past, the abortion facility had left journals in the recovery room for women to write down their feelings after abortion. Couri decided to look at them for her research. Couri had always believed that she was helping women by providing abortions. But she was in for a shock:
I noticed that in the abortion clinic that there were stacks and stacks of journals down there... So, I was like, oh wow this is great. I have untainted, qualitative research in terms of how women feel right after their abortion. So, in my mind it would've been a fabulous research study. So I went down to the clinic one day when nobody was there, and was just like, I'm going to peek through them and kind of see what they say. And some of them said things like, "I'm so relieved, everyone here has been so kind," but as I started flipping through the journals there were entries like, "Oh my God, what have I done? I killed my baby." Like, panicked writing. 
These entries had a profound effect on her:
And I can remember the feeling I had where I was literally confused. I was like, wait what? I couldn't believe it. I had fully expected that people would [be] relieved. You know, projecting myself onto them – that they would be relieved. But it was all these other reactions and they were written down. It caused me to double take, and I was like, wait what? People – and then I started thinking, where do these people go? Some of them are young. What did they do? They're leaving here. What kind of support systems do they have? They feel this way – it really messed with my world.… It did not match up with what I thought reality was, and I couldn't deny it, because it was written down. There was no agenda behind these people writing it down. It was just pure unadulterated reaction to how they felt after an abortion. 
The journals caused Couri to reconsider what she was doing. It began to dawn on her that abortion was not helping women. At first, she tried to set up a post-abortion support group in the facility. But she had trouble attracting women to it. Many women seemed to want to forget their abortions happened. They did not want to return to the abortion facility or talk to Couri.

Shortly after gaining this new perspective, Couri left the abortion industry.

[Today's guest post is by Sarah Terzo.]

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

We asked, you answered: Wishing you hadn't had the "choice"


We recently asked our facebook followers for their take on the following question, which had been posed politely and in good faith by a pro-choicer on twitter:
Whenever I hear someone say they became pro-life after an abortion or crisis pregnancy, it seems like they're saying "I wish I didn't have the *choice* to have an abortion." This is a thought I can't really comprehend. Can someone please explain this thought process and what goes into it? Maybe post-abortive pro-lifers aren't actually thinking this, but something else?
Many people who regret their abortions responded. Interestingly, many who chose life also shared how the availability of legal abortion made their situations more difficult. As Feminists for Life of America has aptly put it: "It's your body, it's your choice, it's your problem!"

In no particular order, here are a few of our favorite comments:

Renee F.:  The biggest regret for me was that I didn't know to ask to see the ultrasound screen. They turned it away from me and for some reason, I didn't ask to see it. Maybe because I was so deliriously sick from HG that I could barely keep my eyes open. (My mother wouldn’t take me to the hospital for it because she wanted the abortion.) Being a mother now, and seeing my first ultrasound with my baby I have now, I know I wouldn’t have gone through with it if I had that opportunity. Also, the emotional toll it takes on you. It’s been 6 years since mine and I still think about it every day and regret it every day. I very much wish it wasn't an available option for myself or anyone.

Nikki H.: If the "choice" didn't exist, I probably would have told my parents sooner, because I'd have known they would have to find out eventually. That part would have been out of the way, and I could have enjoyed my pregnancy, instead of trying to hide it for the first four months. I also wouldn't have to live with the knowledge that I almost killed my son. Yes, I DO wish I hadn't had a "choice."

Lori B.: I definitely wish I did not have the choice! When I found out I was pregnant I immediately wanted to keep my baby. I had no idea my high school sweetheart would react the way he did and would leave me if I had the baby... then my previously "pro-life" parents scolded me for getting pregnant before marriage and pretty much pushed me to have an abortion (I was still a teen living at home and they said "You're on your own if you keep a baby"). Then the doctor told us my baby was "Not a baby... just tissue." Back in the 80's I had no idea HE WAS LYING and just saying what my parents wanted to hear! I BELIEVE HAD ABORTION BEEN ILLEGAL, my parents would not have pushed me to get one and I would have my child!

Julia S.: I regrettably had two abortions. My mother forced me to have my first one in 1976. So yes, I profoundly regret that the option was available then. I chose to have my second abortion, but ONLY because by then, a year and a half later, I was so completely numb due to coping with the first abortion through copious amounts of drugs and alcohol, I didn't even care anymore. But I knew I was killing my first child. I was crushed but powerless to do anything different. And I was just dead inside by the time I had my second one. I most definitely regret it was even an option!! I'm glad you asked.

Darci P.: I was pregnant while in high school with my now 12-year-old. If it wasn’t a choice, I wouldn't have had to defend my choice to keep my daughter. I wouldn’t have been told that my life was over or been given a lot of unsolicited advice... I would likely have been given encouragement and felt empowered to take on the world.

Anonymous (via private message): I am post-abortive and pro-life. I wasn't given a choice by my parents as a teen. I was kicked out of the house when my dad found out I was pregnant because he didn't want a "whore" living in his house. I was taken to stay with family and told I couldn't go home until I had the abortion and I was told I could not stay with the family for very long. I would be a bad influence to younger siblings and cousins being a pregnant teen. I hate the phrase "pro-choice." Like me, many other teens (and adult women!) are not given a choice and are coerced and pressured into abortion.

Becky M.: If it hadn't been an option, I wouldn't have even considered it. I believed the lie that women can't achieve their goals if they have children, especially as a single teenage mom. I thought I'd be doomed to poverty, struggle, and failure forever. My family held an intervention (still the most awkward, uncomfortable experience of my life, but in hindsight I'm incredibly grateful for) and I didn't go through with it. It took 10 years for me to finally admit that I almost killed my son and become strongly pro-life. But I realized it wasn't just my child's life that was saved—it was also mine. Saved from a lifetime of despair and regret. If I can prevent other women from experiencing that, I will. (And, by the way, I still accomplished my goal of earning my bachelors degree and becoming a teacher. My firstborn is now a Marine, and I’ve committed myself to living a pro-life life by adopting, sponsoring, donating, and advocating.)

Bonnie T.: I wish I didn’t have the "choice" to have an abortion, because I never wanted one. Then my mother wouldn’t have had the option of forcing me to get one or be kicked out on the street at 16. Then there would have been access to more help to parent my child as I wanted to. Then my doctor and the therapist my mother hired to coerce me into it wouldn’t have had the option to refer her to a serial killer who gladly performed the abortion against my will.

Ellie M.: When you put tempting choices before people who are vulnerable, YES they will want that choice taken away. People on diets want certain foods removed from easy access and choices all the time. They take soda machines out of schools. This isn't a complicated concept.

Monday, March 16, 2020

Interview: How Gabriela became a sidewalk counselor outside the clinic where she had her abortion

I met Gabriela recently through Secular Pro-Life. I asked her if she had always been pro-life, and when she said no, I asked her what brought her to our side. Her story moved me, and she gave me permission to share it through an interview. - Monica

How long were you pro-choice? What were the main reasons you were pro-choice? I was pro-choice for as long as I can remember. It's funny: I don't remember the exact moment I first heard the word "abortion" or learned what it was; I just remember always supporting it. Even though I grew up Catholic and went to a Catholic high school, I don't remember it ever really being mentioned. But honestly I was pro-choice mainly because I never wanted children. And it just seemed logical to me that if you don't want kids, you would support abortion. It didn't make sense to be pregnant for nine months only to give the kid to someone else.

Tell me about your abortion. What led you to that decision? The part that gets me most about my abortion is that I had an IUD (intrauterine device), so none of this was supposed to happen. I had a Paragard (copper) IUD, which is supposedly 99.7% effective, and yet approximately six months after the IUD was inserted, I got pregnant. My ultrasound appointment showed that the IUD was exactly where it was supposed to be—it didn't fall out or embed in the uterus; it just didn't work. I decided to have an abortion out of pure panic: I was terrified. I had intended to prevent pregnancy, and I wasn't planning on this, so an abortion just seemed like the logical choice.

How did you feel about it after? The moment after my abortion, I felt relief. The day after, I felt a despair and hopelessness and horror at what I had done unlike anything I had ever experienced in my life. It's still hard to talk about.

What did you do to try to get support and heal? In order to try and heal, I named my child. I also participated in a retreat with Rachel's Vineyard, a Catholic post-abortion recovery group that I found through my church bulletin. I tried therapy for a couple sessions, and then I joined a local sidewalk advocate group, which I found out about through a nearby crisis pregnancy center. After that, I was able to get a copy of my ultrasound picture, which I framed.

All of these methods helped in some way, and I basically did them one after the other. Naming my child and framing his ultrasound picture were important because those gestures acknowledged his humanity. Though it was too early to determine the gender of my unborn child, I just knew he was a boy. The retreat helped because it made me realize I wasn't alone, and it provided the participants little mementos to honor our unborn children. Therapy kind of helped, but I needed something more. 

Being a sidewalk advocate really helped because I could actually do something useful, rather than just wallow in regret. Sidewalk advocacy has helped me process my abortion by providing me an opportunity to use my story for good. I wish, more than anything, that someone had been on the sidewalk when I went to get my abortion. I now want to be that person for others, and hopefully prevent other women and unborn babies from going through what I and my unborn child went through. A couple of months after I started, a young woman told me that years ago she was about about to get an abortion but someone was on the sidewalk so she changed her mind. Her baby is now 3 years old.

Did you know the sidewalk counselors before you started working alongside them? Before I joined the group, I didn't know anything about them, but I wanted to join a group that I knew valued unborn children and shared my newfound pro-life beliefs.

Did you tell them your story? If so, what were their reactions? I have told them and they are very supportive of me. They think it can really change people's hearts to hear about my regret, particularly because I am now an advocate outside the abortion facility where I received my abortion.

Are you close to people who are pro-choice (friends, family, etc.)? What are those relationships like? I am close with people who are pro-choice, and the relationships are fine because we just don't talk about my abortion. Only a few people know, and they responded without judgment. But overall I just don't really talk about it much with those I know.

If you could say anything to yourself years ago, what advice would you give? If I could say something to my younger self, I'm telling you she would not have listened! In all seriousness, I think the best way to change a pro-choicer's mindset is to ask some simple questions: If a pregnant woman is murdered, should the perpetrator be charged with one murder or two, and why? If you're in a burning building and have to choose between saving a pregnant woman or saving a woman who isn't pregnant,  who would you save and why? If it's the woman's choice, is it okay for a woman to use abortion as birth control? If not, what's not okay about it? These pointed questions might have made me question my pro-choice stance a lot earlier, which in turn could have saved my child's life.


Friday, March 13, 2020

Pregnancy resource centers need your support now more than ever

If you have the financial ability to donate to a pregnancy center, now is the time to do so. Pregnancy centers and their clients face tremendous challenges from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

Photo by Tim Marshall on Unsplash
Nearly three out of four people who have abortions say that financial strain contributed to the abortion decision ("I can't afford a baby now."). Pregnancy centers exist to provide the support necessary to make choosing life easier, including free baby and maternity supplies, job training, prenatal care, and direct financial assistance.

As the coronavirus causes major disruptions to the tourism, entertainment, sports, and service industries, with the effects reverberating to other sectors, the number of families needing financial help is growing. The situation will get worse before it gets better.

Making matters worse, many non-profits, including pregnancy centers, have been forced to cancel or postpone fundraising galas. And on top of that, as universities close and elderly Americans are advised to stay home for their own safety, pregnancy centers could lose two major sources of volunteers: college students and retirees. It's a perfect storm.

Please donate to your local pregnancy center. If you don't have a local center, consider giving to a center in a hard-hit area, like Washington state. Your generosity can make a world of difference for a struggling family.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

On this day in pro-life history: Harlan Drake convicted of murdering abortion protester Jim Pouillon

Today marks the ten-year anniversary of Harlan Drake's conviction for first-degree murder in the shooting deaths of abortion protester Jim Pouillon and businessman Mike Fuoss. The murders took place in Owosso, Michigan on September 11, 2009. A jury convicted Drake six months later on March 11, 2010.

Harlan Drake's mugshot
Drake testified that he murdered Pouillon for displaying a sign which reportedly "featured a picture of an aborted fetus on one side." Drake "said he pulled up beside Pouillon, shot him and then, because Pouillon was still moving, shot him again before driving away." Pouillon, who was 63 years old and used an oxygen tank, didn't stand a chance. The murder was premeditated; Drake confessed "he told his family the day before the killings that he would 'take care of' Pouillon after his mother expressed her disgust with Pouillon's protests." Authorities believe that Pouillon's pro-life activity was Drake's sole motive for the murder, as Drake and Pouillon did not know each other personally.

The Flint Journal described the immediate aftermath of the murder:
A black car can be seen parked at the corner of North and Whitehaven streets, where a portable oxygen tank is lying in a front yard next to a large sign bearing the image of a baby and the word "Life."
After killing Pouillon, Drake drove to the Fuoss Gravel Company and murdered its owner, Mike Fuoss. The motive for this second murder was apparently unrelated to abortion. Fuoss and Drake's mother were former business partners whose relationship had soured years earlier. Horrifically, Drake shot Fuoss seventeen times.

Drake is currently serving a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole.